Daily Notes 08.09.18

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https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46369479&nid=1010&title=this-app-works-like-tinder–for-female-friendships

https://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=46373650&title=fire-updates-coal-hollow-fire-in-utah-county-grows-to-172k-acres

https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46373646&nid=148&title=wildfire-smoke-from-canyon-creating-dangerous-air-quality-in-spanish-fork

SPANISH FORK — Despite air quality improving around the state, Spanish Fork’s air quality is in the red zone Thursday morning, due to smoke drifting down Spanish Fork Canyon as a result of nearby wildfires.

The air quality index level in Spanish Fork is currently at 242, according to KSL Meteorologist Grant Weyman.

“This is about the highest number I have ever seen on our air quality scale,” Weyman said. “We know we’ve got the fire in Spanish Fork Canyon. The winds, typically this time of morning, go downslope. It looks like we are getting some very, very bad air, no doubt, due to the smoke.”

Wildfire smoke from canyon creating dangerous air quality in Spanish Fork

https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46373429&nid=1419&title=woman-issues-warning-after-losing-over-1m-to-man-she-met-on-dating-site

IDAHO FALLS — It started with $40.

He needed the money to help his friend, and Debby Montgomery Johnson didn’t think much of it.

After all, she had been dating Eric for nearly two months, and they were in love. They chatted online for hours every day. She had seen photos of the handsome British man and he filled a large void in her life after the sudden death of Debby’s husband.

Two years and over $1 million later, Debby’s world would come crashing down as she learned Eric was a Nigerian con artist, and she was left to pick up the shattered pieces of her life.

https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46373382&nid=148&title=report-more-found-unsheltered-in-2018-count-but-first-time-homelessness-trending-down-in-utah

https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46372924&nid=157&title=man-at-compound-accused-of-training-kids-for-school-attacks

TAOS, N.M. (AP) — A father arrested at a ramshackle New Mexico compound where 11 hungry children were found living in filth was training youngsters to commit school shootings, prosecutors said in court documents obtained Wednesday.

The allegations against Siraj Ibn Wahhaj came to light as authorities awaited word on whether human remains discovered at the site were those of his missing son, who is severely disabled and went missing in December in Jonesboro, Georgia, near Atlanta.

The documents say Wahhaj was conducting weapons training with assault rifles at the compound on the outskirts of Amalia, a tiny town near the Colorado border marked by scattered homes and sagebrush.

“He poses a great danger to the children found on the property as well as a threat to the community as a whole due to the presence of firearms and his intent to use these firearms in a violent and illegal manner,” Prosecutor Timothy Hasson wrote in the court documents Wednesday.

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Have You Seen This? Herd of cows help police make arrest

https://www.ksl.com/?nid=235&sid=46373609&title=firefighters-wife-baby-among-93-victims-of-greece-blaze

https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46373574&nid=157&title=tribune-calls-off-39b-buyout-by-sinclair

https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46373839&nid=1017&title=have-you-seen-this-drone-captures-bizarre-movements-of-farm-sheep

https://www.thedailybeast.com/russia-reacts-angrily-to-draconian-new-sanctions-from-us

https://www.yahoo.com/news/man-breaks-legs-jumping-border-wall-california-001411023.html

CALEXICO, Calif. (AP) — A man attempting to enter the United States illegally has fallen from a new 30-foot high wall in California, breaking both his legs.

Border Patrol surveillance video shows the man lying motionless on the ground after tossing his body over the bollard-style barrier Sunday night in downtown Calexico, east of San Diego.

Paramedics determined that the man broke his legs and may have injured his back. He was taken to a hospital in Palm Springs.

The Border Patrol didn’t identify the man. Spokesman Carlos Pitones says the U.S. government typically pays medical expenses for people who are injured crossing the border illegally and they are deported after recovery.

The government is replacing a 2-mile stretch of barrier made from recycled metal scraps and landing mat with the new bollard-style wall.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/crime-courts/boston-area-man-arrested-threatening-ice-agents-twitter-n899146

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/bizarre-plight-1000-crocodiles-left-13055272

Chicago’s Former Rock-N-Roll McDonald’s Now Open

fern 1 Chicagos Former Rock N Roll McDonalds Opens Today

A floating garden enclosed in glass inside the new McDonald’s opening in River North.

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Description

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Two families face off making their “Best Family Recipe Dinners!”

Team of 5 family members: from grandparents, cousins, aunts, uncles, or even close family friends. No chef experience needed!

Families can win a year’s worth of groceries or a BIG cash prize!

Must be a Utah local, or provide your own transportation to the studio.

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Questions? Email adamsavagecasting@gmail.com

https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46372922&nid=157&title=14000-fight-california-fires-some-from-prisons-or-overseas

Kent Porter, The Press Democrat via AP

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

By Jonathan J. Cooper and Paul Elias, Associated Press  |  Posted Aug 9th, 2018 @ 10:32am


26 photos

UKIAH, Calif. (AP) — Firefighters said for the first time Wednesday that they have made good progress battling the state’s largest-ever wildfire but didn’t expect to have it fully under control until September.The blaze north of San Francisco has grown to the size of Los Angeles since it started two weeks ago, fueled by dry vegetation, high winds and rugged terrain that made it too dangerous for firefighters to directly attack the flames now spanning 470 square miles (1,217 square kilometers).

Crews, including inmates and firefighters from overseas, have managed to cut lines around half the fire to contain the flames, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said. The blaze about 100 miles (160 kilometers) north of San Francisco around the resort region of Clear Lake has destroyed 116 homes and injured two firefighters.

Those lines have kept the southern edge of the fire from spreading into residential areas on the east side of the lake. But Cal Fire said the flames are out of control to the north, roaring into remote and unpopulated areas of thick forests and deep ravines as firefighters contend with record-setting temperatures.

California is seeing earlier, longer and more destructive wildfire seasons because of drought, warmer weather attributed to climate change and home construction deeper into the forests.

Cal Fire Battalion Chief Jonathan Cox said the area has few natural barriers to slow flames and terrain that firefighters can’t get to. So firefighters fall back to the nearest road, ridge or river, where they bulldoze a wide line and wait for the flames to come to them.

The Mendocino Complex, which will take months to put out, is one of 18 burning throughout the state Wednesday. Because of such extreme conditions early on, officials and experts warn that California could be facing its toughest wildfire season yet, with the historically worst months still to come.

Here’s a look at the firefighters who are battling California’s blazes:

14,000 firefighters

They are deployed statewide and led by Cal Fire. The state’s firefighting agency employs 5,300 full-time firefighters and hires an additional 1,700 each fire season. Trained prisoners and firefighters from 17 states and around the world fill out the ranks.

Watch the growth of the Mendocino California fire:

animated

They are battling blazes on the Nevada border and along the coast. Cal Fire crews are helping federal firefighters put out flames in national forests and one that has reached Yosemite National Park, prompting its closure at the height of tourist season.

Those on the ground get help from more than 1,000 fire engines, 59 bulldozers, 22 air tankers, 17 airplanes, 12 helicopters and 11 mobile kitchens.

Firefighters under Cal Fire’s command have helped Oregon authorities fight a fire near the California border and responded to a blaze that broke out this week in Orange County and burned a dozen cabins.

4,088 at Mendocino Complex fire

The state’s largest wildfire in history has drawn a contingent to battle what is actually two fires burning so closely together that they’re being attacked as one.

Though it’s exploded in size, more firefighters are fighting a fire near Redding that has killed six people and destroyed more than 1,000 homes and businesses. It threatens a much larger urban area, so Cal Fire has devoted more resources to it.

Both blazes are considered nearly half contained.

1,916 inmates

California prisoners also are fighting fires. Cal Fire trains minimum-security inmates and pays them $1 an hour in the field and $2 a day when they’re not on duty. Inmate firefighters also typically have their sentences reduced for every day spent fighting fires.

They do similar work to any firefighter, working long hours and sleeping in camps with other inmates. Most are on the front lines, using chain saws and hand tools to reduce tinder-dry brush and trees to stop the flames.

53 from Down Under

Firefighters from Australia and New Zealand are helping California, arriving this week at the Mendocino Complex Fire after an 8,600-mile (13,840-kilometer) flight and two-hour bus trip.

Craig Cottrill, chief of the Wellington Fire Department in New Zealand, said his country doesn’t see fires nearly as big as California’s.

“Everything is on a 100 times scale,” he said. “This thing’s massive.”

Rob Gore, a firefighter from the Australian capital of Canberra, said it makes for good relationships that Australians often fight fires in North America and that Canadians and Americans regularly fight fires in his country.

“When those big events happen across the continents, we all pitch in,” he said.

The New Zealanders have been assigned as safety officers, line supervisors and heavy equipment “bosses” who direct bulldozer operators.

200 soldiers

They are undergoing four days of training to fight wildfires and are expected to be deployed to California next week, U.S. Army Col. Rob Manning said in a statement. Authorities haven’t decided where to send the soldiers from the Tacoma, Washington-based 14th Brigade Engineer Battalion.

They will be outfitted with wildland protective gear, organized into 10 teams and led by experienced civilian firefighters. Personnel from the same base helped fight California wildfires last year.

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Elias reported from San Francisco. Associated Press writer Amanda Lee Myers in Los Angeles and Haven Daley in the Mendocino National Forest also contributed to this report.

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas
14,000 fight California fires, some from prisons or overseas

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https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46373008&nid=148

SALT LAKE CITY — At least two people were injured, including a woman who jumped from a third-story balcony, during a large apartment complex fire early Wednesday.

Salt Lake City fire crews were called to the Seasons at Pebble Creek Apartments, 1620 W. Snow Queen Place (1675 South), just after 2 a.m. The fire was believed to have started inside an apartment on the third floor, said Fire Capt. Dan Marlowe. By the time firefighters were able to get a hose to the third floor, the fire had burned through the roof and was spreading quickly through the attic, he said.

“At that point we decided that life safety was going to be the word of the day. Rather than continuing to fight the fire at that time, we evacuated the structure, went door to door, made sure there was nobody else inside of the building,” he said.

About 40 people were evacuated from the 12 units in the building. Surrounding apartment buildings were also evacuated as a precaution, but crews were able to prevent the flames from jumping to nearby structures.

Jim Pavlish was one of those evacuated from an adjacent building. He said he first started smelling smoke through an open window about 1:15 a.m. and thought it was just more smoke from the wildfires. But not long after, he realized it was something more.

“I hear screaming. Clearly it’s coming from real close. I look out, it’s the next building over,” he said. “People are screaming. I go down to look. It looks like they got everybody out. One lady has inhaled a ton of smoke. People are in shock.”

At least two people suffered minor injuries. A woman who jumped from her third-floor balcony to escape suffered a twisted ankle, Marlowe said. Another man was treated for smoke inhalation. Both were transported to local hospitals for treatment.

The top floor of the apartment is considered a total loss, he said. And while fire destroyed the upper level, Marlowe said the lower levels suffered heavy water damage and will likely also be declared total losses. He did not know if tenants from the lower levels would be able to salvage any personal items.

A total of 24 apartments were “affected to varying degrees,” according to Salt Lake City fire officials.

The Red Cross was on scene to help displaced residents. A cause of the fire was undetermined as of Wednesday morning. It took crews about 90 minutes to bring it under control.

Residents say this is at least the second fire in the complex in the past year.

Woman jumps from burning building; 12 apartments destroyed

Woman jumps from burning building; 12 apartments destroyed

Woman jumps from burning building; 12 apartments destroyed

Woman jumps from burning building; 12 apartments destroyed

Woman jumps from burning building; 12 apartments destroyed

Woman jumps from burning building; 12 apartments destroyed

Marlene Bemis

https://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=46373767&title=shots-fired-at-house-fire-in-west-valley-officials-say

Police: Man arrested after code enforcement officer fatally shot, house set on fire

Police: Man arrested after code enforcement officer fatally shot, house set on fire

Police: Man arrested after code enforcement officer fatally shot, house set on firePolice: Man arrested after code enforcement officer fatally shot, house set on fire

Police: Man arrested after code enforcement officer fatally shot, house set on fire

Police: Man arrested after code enforcement officer fatally shot, house set on fire

Police: Man arrested after code enforcement officer fatally shot, house set on fire

https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46373719&nid=757&title=pence-outlines-us-space-force-plan-for-next-battlefield

Pence outlines US Space Force plan for ‘next battlefield’
By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press | Posted Aug 9th, 2018 @ 3:12pm

YouTube: Pence outlines plan for new Space Force by 2020Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) — Pointing to growing threats and competition from Russia and China, the White House on Thursday announced ambitious plans to create the U.S. Space Force as a sixth, separate military warfighting service by 2020.

The proposal taps into the American public’s long fascination with space but with a military focus, and it faces daunting hurdles. It requires congressional approval and has been met with skepticism from military leaders and experts who question the wisdom of launching an expensive, bureaucratic new service branch.

Vice President Mike Pence announced the new force during a Pentagon speech, fleshing out an idea that President Donald Trump has flagged in recent months as he vowed to ensure American dominance in space. Pence described space as a domain that was once peaceful and uncontested but has now become crowded and adversarial.

“Now the time has come to write the next great chapter in the history of our armed forces, to prepare for the next battlefield where America’s best and bravest will be called to deter and defeat a new generation of threats to our people, to our nation,” said Pence.
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Trump marked Pence’s announcement with a tweet: “Space Force all the way!”

Pence portrayed the change as a response to foes’ potential aggression rather than any offensive U.S. military effort.

Citing Russia and China, he said that for years U.S. adversaries have “pursued weapons to jam, blind and disable our navigation and communication satellites via electronic attacks from the ground.”

“As their actions make clear, our adversaries have transformed space into a warfighting domain already, and the United States will not shrink from this challenge,” he said.

In June, the president directed the Pentagon to create a “separate but equal” space force, a complicated and expensive move that could take years to gain Congress’ approval and become operational. On Thursday, Pence said the administration will work with Congress on the plan, and will outline a budget next year. The last time the U.S. created a new uniformed military service was in 1947, when the Air Force was launched after World War II. It joined the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis has endorsed steps to reorganize the military’s space warfighting forces and create a new command, but has previously opposed launching an expensive new service. A new branch of the military would require layers of bureaucracy, military and civilian leaders, uniforms, equipment and an expansive support structure.

Asked about the cost, Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan told reporters the Pentagon doesn’t have a number yet but will when the legislative proposal is finished by the end of the year.

“I would assume it’s billions,” he said.

Deborah James, who served as Air Force secretary for the final three years of the Obama administration, estimated it would be five to 10 years before a separate service would be fully formed.

“Eventually, it’ll settle out, but you will go through years of thrashing. And is that thrashing going to slow your momentum or is it going to help you achieve your goals and address the real challenges that we have on our plate?” she said at Brookings Institution last week. “I don’t think so. I don’t. I wouldn’t vote in favor of it.”

The military’s role in space has been under scrutiny because the United States is increasingly reliant on orbiting satellites that are difficult to protect. Satellites provide communications, navigation, intelligence and other services vital to the military and the national economy.

U.S. intelligence agencies reported earlier this year that Russia and China were pursuing “nondestructive and destructive” anti-satellite weapons for use during a future war. And there are growing worries about cyberattacks that could target satellite technology, potentially leaving troops in combat without electronic communications or navigation abilities.

The Pentagon proposal delivered to Congress Thursday lays out plans to consolidate U.S. warfighting space forces and make organizational changes to boost the acquisition and development of technologies.

It says the department will establish a Space Command to develop warfighting operations, a Space Development Agency to more quickly identify and develop new technologies, a Space Operations Force of leaders and fighters and a new support structure. In the second phase the Pentagon would combine all the components into the new sixth branch of service.

In the meantime, the Space Command would be led by a four-star general, and Pence said a new high-level civilian post — assistant defense secretary for space — would also be created.

“We are glad that the Pentagon is finally taking these steps in enhancing our space strength,” Reps. Mike Rogers, R-Ala., and Jim Cooper, D-Tenn., leaders of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces, said in a statement. They said the Pentagon report was the start of a “multi-year process that we think will result in a safer, stronger America.”

Much of the military’s current space power is wielded by the Air Force Space Command, which has its headquarters at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The command has about 38,000 personnel and operates 185 military satellite systems, including the Global Positioning System and communications and weather satellites. It also oversees Air Force cyberwarfare.

Under the new plan, space elements that are now scattered across the department would be gathered under one command, which Pence said would better ensure integration across the military

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Associated Press Radio correspondent Sagar Meghani in Washington and writer Dan Elliott in Colorado contributed to this report.

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Description

4 year old male border collie needs a new home not enough time for him anymore. Never been a house dog always been outside. Not neutered has father a few litters of puppies.

 


 

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https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46373008&nid=148

Woman jumps from burning building; 12 apartments destroyed

By Pat Reavy, KSL and Caitlin Burchill, KSL TV  |  Posted Aug 8th, 2018 @ 5:33pm


8 photos
22

5PM: Woman jumps from burning building; 12 apartments destroyed
Caitlin Burchill, KSL TV

+Show 3 more videos

SALT LAKE CITY — At least two people were injured, including a woman who jumped from a third-story balcony, during a large apartment complex fire early Wednesday.

Salt Lake City fire crews were called to the Seasons at Pebble Creek Apartments, 1620 W. Snow Queen Place (1675 South), just after 2 a.m. The fire was believed to have started inside an apartment on the third floor, said Fire Capt. Dan Marlowe. By the time firefighters were able to get a hose to the third floor, the fire had burned through the roof and was spreading quickly through the attic, he said.

“At that point we decided that life safety was going to be the word of the day. Rather than continuing to fight the fire at that time, we evacuated the structure, went door to door, made sure there was nobody else inside of the building,” he said.

About 40 people were evacuated from the 12 units in the building. Surrounding apartment buildings were also evacuated as a precaution, but crews were able to prevent the flames from jumping to nearby structures.

Jim Pavlish was one of those evacuated from an adjacent building. He said he first started smelling smoke through an open window about 1:15 a.m. and thought it was just more smoke from the wildfires. But not long after, he realized it was something more.

“I hear screaming. Clearly it’s coming from real close. I look out, it’s the next building over,” he said. “People are screaming. I go down to look. It looks like they got everybody out. One lady has inhaled a ton of smoke. People are in shock.”

At least two people suffered minor injuries. A woman who jumped from her third-floor balcony to escape suffered a twisted ankle, Marlowe said. Another man was treated for smoke inhalation. Both were transported to local hospitals for treatment.

The top floor of the apartment is considered a total loss, he said. And while fire destroyed the upper level, Marlowe said the lower levels suffered heavy water damage and will likely also be declared total losses. He did not know if tenants from the lower levels would be able to salvage any personal items.

A total of 24 apartments were “affected to varying degrees,” according to Salt Lake City fire officials.

The Red Cross was on scene to help displaced residents. A cause of the fire was undetermined as of Wednesday morning. It took crews about 90 minutes to bring it under control.

Residents say this is at least the second fire in the complex in the past year.

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